​Difference between TIG and MIG welding​ (Pros & Cones): Weldlover

Welding is a process that is used to make a joint between two separate metal pieces by utilizing high heat and pressure. Depending upon the type, specification, and physical composition of the metal, welding professionals apply various procedures to produce accurate results. Two of the most common welding processes are TIG and MIG welding. In this article, we will elaborate on the difference between TIG and MIG welding processes.

What is TIG welding?

Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding is a form of arc welding which manipulates an unburnable tungsten electrode to form the weld. In the whole welding process, the electrode and the weld are conserved from contamination by a non-reactive shielding gas, either argon or helium, and their dual composition. Moreover, a filler metal is necessary to make welds, except you are fusing two metals together.

In this process, an electric arc comes out of the electrode surrounded by the shielding gas that penetrates the base metals to create welds. An electric arc is extremely hot, which is capable of melting the metal. Due to this nature, the process is not meant for welding metals with low melting points and a thin diameter.

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Pros:

  • Very low maintenance
  • Accuracy and precision
  • No need for filler if you have to fuse base metals
  • Clean process
  • It gives control over the process

Cons:

  • Positioning is very important in the TIG welding technique
  • The cost of operation is higher than MIG welding

What is MIG welding?

Metal inert gas (MIG) welding is a form of arc welding technique in which a consumable electrode produces an electric arc that melts the filler material to form a joint between workpiece metals. The electric arc is extremely hot, which causes the filler metal and workpiece metals to melt and form joints.

Moreover, the shielding gas (which can be either argon, helium, carbon, and their mixture) goes side by side with the electric arc to prevent the newly formed weld from atmospheric contamination. In addition, the process can be either semi-automatic or automatic.

Pros:

  • The whole process remains super clean
  • It requires less time to accomplish
  • Low operational cost
  • Accuracy is remarkable
  • The ideal technique for newbies as it is easier to learn

Cons:

  • It is not suitable for thin and soft metals welding
  • Not as strong as TIG welding

What are the key differences between TIG and MIG welding?

The main difference between TIG and MIG welding is that the electric arc is originated in between a burnable electrode and metal workpiece in MIG welding while an electric arc is formed in between a non-consumable electrode and base metal In TIG welding.

All differences are well described in the below-given table:

S.no
MIG Welding
TIG Welding

1.

It stands for metal inert gas welding and is also known as gas metal arc welding  (GMAW)
It stands for tungsten inert gas welding and is also known as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW)

 2.

In this process of arc welding, the electric arc is originated in between a burnable electrode and a metal workpiece
In this method of arc welding, the electric arc is formed in between a non-consumable electrode and base metal

3.

The electrode employed is burnable electrode wires
The electrode utilized is a non-consumable tungsten electrode

4.

The technique is simple and does not require high-level skills to execute this type of welding
The process demands the person be highly skilled in order to accomplish the task

5.

The deposition rate is very high in MIG welding
The deposition rate is low in TIG welding

6.

Filler metal is not necessary to employ this technique because consumable electrode acts as a filler metal
It may require filler metal which depends on if you have to form a joint between two metals by fusing them, then you do not need a filler metal

7.

You will be able to weld up to 4 cm of workpiece metals
You will be able to weld up to 0.5 cm of the workpiece metals

8.

The equipment utilized in the MIG welding technique is a welding gun
The equipment used in the TIG welding technique is a welding torch

9.

It utilizes a continuous wire feed
It does not manipulate continuous wire feed

10.

You can not employ this technique in different positions
You can apply this method in different positions

11.

The process is super fast
The process is time-consuming

Final Words:

Both MIG and TIG are arc welding techniques, and they have their pros and cons. A welder should have experience with both these techniques as they have a wide range of applications. Moreover, if you have to weld thinner and low melting point metals, then TIG welding is preferable over MIG welding as it will not burn the base metals.

Valuable Links:

TIG welding of copper